Archives

Spring Comes to Ottawa

Cedar Waxwing

April has arrived, and I think spring has finally arrived with it. We’ve finally had some nice, sunny days and the weather has warmed up, so Deb and I finally got together to do some birding on the second day of April. We headed over to Mud Lake, where we only managed to tally 20 species; this is usually a great place to take in spring migration, but there was surprisingly little difference in the species seen since my previous visit on March 18th. The best birds there were an American Tree Sparrow, three Wood Ducks flying along the river, and an adult Cooper’s Hawk in the woods. Once again a male and female Downy Woodpecker pair came readily to my hand to take some food. I am now noting these birds in eBird, as I’ve been hand-feeding them for a couple of years now. The starlings singing near the filtration plant were of special interest, as we heard them imitating the calls of a Killdeer, an Eastern Wood-pewee, and even a Tree Frog!

Continue reading

A Walk at the Pond

Eastern Cottontail

Eastern Cottontail

On the last day of July I got a late start and headed over to the storm water ponds with the intention of checking them briefly before heading elsewhere. However, I had such a great time I ended up spending almost 90 minutes there! Once again when I arrived, I was startled to see a number of swallows flying above the ponds. Most appeared to be Barn Swallows, but I did see at least two Bank Swallows flying with them. It is interesting to think that they managed to nest here this past summer with all the construction going on; fortunately the bridge they nest under hasn’t been touched by the construction. I later found the Barn Swallows resting on the roof of a nearby house, and counted about 15 of them.

Continue reading

Where Dragonflies Grow on Trees

Common Raven (juvenile)

Common Raven (juvenile)

On Victoria Day I returned to Mud Lake to look for migrants and dragonflies. I arrived early – before 7:00am – in order to beat the crowds, but even at that time there were a few people wandering around. I started at the ridge and worked my way around the conservation area in a clockwise direction; I hoped that by exploring the quieter side trails I would come up with a decent list for the morning. Well, I did finish my outing with a good number of bird species – 43 total – but most of them were found along the northern and western sides, which is where I usually bird anyway, especially when I am short on time.

Continue reading

Two Baldpates and A Bufflehead

Hooded Merganser

Hooded Merganser

December is here, and this morning I headed over to Mud Lake to get some more practice with my new Nikon Coolpix P610. Even though the winter birding season officially started five days ago, it still feels like fall, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. Fortunately the daytime temperature has remained above 0°C the past couple of days; although the nights have been cold, neither the Ottawa River nor the large ponds have frozen over yet. We haven’t had any snow yet, either, so I was hoping to find either some late-lingering migrants (Hermit Thrush being the most likely, though I also would accept Song Sparrow, Belted Kingfisher, or Northern Flicker), some irruptive winter species (Bohemian Waxwings, Common Redpolls or Pine Grosbeaks would have been awesome), or something really cool like a Northern Mockingbird or a Townsend’s Solitaire. If there’s one spot in Ottawa where you can count on finding something unseasonal or out-of-range from time to time, it’s Mud Lake – and there are plenty of berries there for any winter wanderers.

Continue reading

Migration Resumes!

Snapping Turtle

Snapping Turtle

I resumed my early morning visits to Hurdman on Monday, May 4th and was happy to finally see some new birds. I realized things had changed when I heard my first Black-throated Green Warbler along the feeder path. It was foraging in a relatively small tree, and when I saw a second bird darting among the new leaves I was pleased when I identified it as a Nashville Warbler.

A Ruby-crowned Kinglet was also present, as were several White-throated Sparrows scurrying along the path. It seems like I’ve been waiting for these birds to arrive for ages, and to my surprise I found a single White-crowned Sparrow among them. The White-crowns arrive later in May, after the juncos leave, and I wasn’t quite expecting them yet as I had just seen a junco two days earlier at the Beaver Trail (my last junco sighting of the spring, as it turns out). Altogether I saw between 20 and 30 White-throated Sparrows foraging in various spots along the trail, the largest flock of clear-cut migrants I had seen so far – I have seen and heard other White-throated Sparrows this spring, but never more than ten, and those behaved more like breeding residents singing on territory than migrants just passing through. (Indeed, this turned out to the only large flock of migrant White-throats I’ve observed this spring, adding another mystery to this year’s spring migration.)

Continue reading

The End of Winter

Porcupine

Porcupine

February has ended, and so has the winter birding season. Although the weather is by no means spring-like just yet (we just received another 30 cm of snow last week!), it is time to put the 2012-13 winter list away and look forward to the first spring migrants returning. Already the cardinals, chickadees, and House Finches are singing their spring songs, and just last week I heard the first Mourning Dove calling in the neighbourhood. This is especially significant as I haven’t seen or heard any doves in the neighbourhood at all this past winter.

Deb and I have been going out birding nearly every weekend. At the beginning of February we took a drive out to the east end where we found a flock of Snow Buntings on Giroux Road together with a single Horned Lark – a new bird for my winter list. The Snow Buntings were the first ones I’d seen in the Ottawa area – we had some at Amherst Island in January – and when they landed on top of a telephone wire I rolled the window down and took a few pictures.

Continue reading

Before the Solstice

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

At this time of year Ottawa receives just under nine hours of daylight each day and the days are still getting shorter. There is barely any light in the sky when I leave home at 7:30 in the morning or work at 4:30 in the afternoon, and there have been more overcast days this month than sunny ones. With only a few days of sun so far this December, it is literally the darkest time of the year.

A little bit of snow and freezing rain earlier this week has laid down a thin, white, icy crust on the lawns and woodland trails that bears little resemblance to the “winter wonderland” of song. Enough grass is visible on some streets that it doesn’t even look like winter, although with the temperature today rising to only -6°C, it sure feels like it.

Continue reading